Dominic Boisvert Partner, Lawyer

Bureau

  • Montréal

Phone number

514 878-5493

Fax

514 871-8977

Bar Admission

  • Québec, 2012

Languages

  • English
  • French

Profile

Partner

Dominic is a member of the firm’s Litigation Group. His practice is primarily focused on insurance law and civil liability. Since his call to the Barreau du Québec, he has developed his expertise in several specialized areas, particularly insurance coverage dispute and the distribution of financial products and services.

He regularly advises Canadian and foreign corporations, including entrepreneurs, manufacturers, insurers and transport companies, and represents them before the courts. He is accustomed to managing complex files and favours a innovative and professional approach to serving his clients' interests and finding practical solutions to their problems.

Dominic frequently publishes articles on topical legal topics, particularly regarding changes in the insurers’ coverage obligations, and occasionally gives accredited training courses on various topics of interests.

In addition to a stint with an international law firm, Dominic previously acted as legal counsel for an important association of healthcare establishments, where he worked with several insurance programs and managed the claims and litigation relating to professional liability. 

Distinctions

  • Ones to Watch, The Best Lawyers in Canada in the field of Insurance Law, 2022

Education

  • LL.B., Université de Montréal, 2011
  • Introduction to Chinese Law Certificate, China University of Political Science and Law (Beijing), 2010


Boards and Professional Affiliations

  • Young Bar Association of Montreal
  • Member of the Executive Committee of the Insurance and Civil Litigation section of the Canadian Bar Association, Québec Branch
  1. Complaint processing: New framework to come for financial institutions and financial intermediaries

    Last September, the AMF published its draft Regulation respecting complaint processing and dispute resolution in the financial sector (the “Draft Regulation”). The consultation period for it ended on December 8, 2021. The AMF is currently reviewing the many comments it received. The Draft Regulation1 aims to harmonize and improve complaint processing in the financial sector by providing for new mechanisms to ensure prompt and efficient complaint processing, among other things. In the insurance industry, only firms and insurers are currently required to adopt and apply a complaint processing and dispute resolution policy. The Draft Regulation will make these obligations apply to independent partnerships and representatives. It also introduces new requirements and restrictions as well as monetary penalties for not including mandatory content in communications to a complainant, for example. Here are some of the Draft Regulation’s new provisions: Broadening of the definition of “complaint” to: Any dissatisfaction or reproach; That cannot be remedied immediately and for which a final response is expected; In respect of a service or product offered by a financial institution or financial intermediary; That is communicated by a person who is a member of the clientele of the institution or intermediary. The Draft Regulation does not contain a requirement that a complaint must be made in writing.2 It does make it mandatory for financial institutions and financial intermediaries to implement a complaint drafting assistance service.3 It also requires that a note be left in each record to indicate whether a complainant requested this service. Prohibition on the use of the term “ombudsman” in any representation or communication intended for the public to refer to the complaint process or to the persons assigned to its implementation.4 Specific requirements as concerns the mandatory content of a complaint processing policy, an acknowledgment of receipt and final response to a complainant, a complaint record and a complaints register.   For each complaint received, the complaint record must include the following information: The complaint Whether the complainant requested the complaint drafting assistance service The complainant’s initial communication A copy of the acknowledgment of receipt sent to the complainant Any document or information used in analyzing the complaint, including any communication with the complainant A copy of the final response provided to the complainant New time limits: Within 10 days of receiving a complaint, the insurer must notify the complainant in writing that they must also file the complaint with any other financial institution, financial intermediary or credit assessment agent involved, and the insurer must provide the complainant with their contact information.5 The complainant must be given 20 days to assess and respond to an offer to resolve the complaint, with sufficient time for the complainant to seek advice for the purpose of making an informed decision.6 If the complainant accepts the offer, the insurer has 30 days to respond.7 Financial institutions and financial intermediaries have a strict 60-day time limit to provide the complainant with a final response.8 There is a new 15-day time limit to send the complaint record to the AMF.9 There is a streamlined process for complaints that are resolved within 10 days of being recorded in the complaints register: The final response serves as an acknowledgment of receipt and must contain the following information: The complaint record identification code The date on which the complaint was received by the insurer or insurance representative The name and contact information of the employee responsible for processing the complaint referred to in section 7 of the Draft Regulation or in the Sound Commercial Practices Guideline A summary of the complaint received The conclusion of the analysis, including reasons, and the outcome of the complaint A reference to the complainant’s right to have the complaint record examined by the AMF The signature of the complaints officer A statement to the effect that the complainant has accepted the offer to resolve the complaint New monetary administrative penalties The Draft Regulation also provides for monetary administrative penalties ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 for failure to comply with certain requirements and prohibitions of the Draft Regulation. For example, the following will be subject to a monetary administrative penalty of $5,000: Attaching a condition to an offer to prevent the complainant from fully exercising their rights. Using the term “ombudsman” or any other similar title in any representation or communication intended for the public to refer to the complaint process or the persons assigned to its implementation to suggest that such persons are not acting on behalf of the financial institution or financial intermediary. In the latter case, a monetary administrative penalty may be imposed even where no complaint is involved, because the prohibition covers “any representation or communication intended for the public.” Insurers and financial intermediaries should review their communications as soon as possible, and especially the summary of their complaint processing policy appearing on their website. It concerns all entities regulated by the AMF, but the bulletin more specifically addresses financial institutions and financial intermediaries in the insurance industry. As currently indicated on the AMF’s website. Draft Regulation, s. 11. Id., s. 26, para. 2. Id., s. 15. Id., s. 13. Id. Id., s. 12, para. 4. Id., s. 25.

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  2. Amendments to the categories of contracts covered by the exemptions to the obligation of an insurer to assume an insured’s defence—the Regulation to come into force

    On April 20, 2022, the government issued Order in Council 656-2022, which makes significant amendments to the Regulation respecting categories of insurance contracts and classes of insureds that may derogate from the rules of articles 2500 and 2503 (the “Regulation”). The original version of the draft regulation with the same title (the “Draft Regulation”) was the subject of one of our publications last September. The Regulation as amended will come into force on the 15th day following the date of its publication in the Gazette officielle du Québec; that is, on May 5, 2022.  Background In its articles 2500 and 2503, the Civil Code of Québec (the “C.C.Q.”) provides that the costs resulting from actions against an insured over and above the proceeds of insurance provided for in civil liability insurance contracts, including those of the defence, are borne by the insurer. In June 2021, the government amended article 2503 of the C.C.Q. to make it possible for some “categories of insurance contracts” and “classes of insureds” to be determined by regulation to depart from these rules.  It is in this context that the Draft Regulation came about. It was was significantly modified following the numerous comments and observations received from various industry stakeholders. Amendments First, sections 1 and 2 were amended to specify when the insured must meet the conditions referred to in these sections, i.e., “at the time of subscription”. The duration of the contracts covered by the first two sections of the Regulation is limited to one year pursuant to the new section 3. It also specified that in the case of contract renewal, the insured must meet the conditions set out in these sections. The provisions of the former section 5 remain, with the necessary adaptations, and are now found in section 4. Finally, sections 6, 7 and 8 were simply removed. Categories of insured covered Below are the categories of insureds who may subscribe to policies that depart from the rules set out in articles 2500 and 2503 of the C.C.Q.: Section 1 Drug manufacturers under the Act respecting prescription drug insurance;[1] Certain corporations incorporated under a private bill;[2] and Directors, officers and trustees of such businesses, except for their activities as members of a pension committee.   Section 2 Companies that are not referred to in section 1, but that meet one of the following conditions “where the total coverage under all the civil liability insurance contracts subscribed by that insured is at least $5,000,000”: Large businesses for the purposes of the Act respecting the Québec sales tax,[3] that is, businesses that have total taxable sales in a given fiscal year in excess of $10 million; A reporting issuer or subsidiary of such a reporting issuer within the meaning of the Securities Act;[4] A foreign business corporation within the meaning of the Taxation Act[5] or the Income Tax Act,[6] that is, a company that is not resident in Canada; and Directors, officers and trustees of such businesses, except for their activities as members of a pension committee. What to expect The amendments to the Draft Regulation reflect a willingness to simplify its application. In this regard, the removal of section 8 will no doubt be well received. Nevertheless, Quebec continues to be an exception to the principle of full freedom of contract. As a result, small and medium-sized enterprises in certain industries may continue to be affected by the tightening of the insurance market in Quebec, including the manufacturing sector that exports to the United States. It remains to be seen whether the Regulation will change over time. If you have any questions on the subject matter of this article or any other questions, feel free to contact a member of Lavery’s insurance team. [1] A-29.01. [2] Act constituting Capital régional et coopératif Desjardins (C-6.1), Act to establish Fondaction, le Fonds de développement de la Confédération des Syndicats Nationaux pour la coopération et l’emploi (F-3.1.2) and Act to establish the Fonds de solidarité des travailleurs du Québec (F.T.Q.) (F-3.2.1). [3] T-0.1. [4] V-1.1. [5] I-3. [6] R.S.C. 1985, c. 1 (5th Supp.).

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  3. Limitation of insurer’s duty to defend: The Draft Regulation specifying the categories of contracts covered is published

    On September 8, 2021, Mr. Éric Girard, Minister of Finance, presented his Draft Regulation specifying the classes of liability insurance contracts that may derogate from public policy rules previously applicable to liability insurance (the “Draft Regulation”), namely those set out in articles 2500 and 2503 of the Civil Code of Québec (“CCQ”) concerning the insurer’s duty to defend and the exclusive application of insurance coverage to injured third parties. Background Since May 27, 2021, article 2503 CCQ reads as follows: The insurer is bound to take up the interest of any person entitled to the benefit of the insurance and assume his defence in any action brought against him. Legal costs and expenses resulting from actions against the insured, including those of the defence, and interest on the proceeds of the insurance are borne by the insurer over and above the proceeds of the insurance. However, the Government may, by regulation, determine categories of insurance contracts that may depart from those rules and from the rule set out in article 2500, as well as classes of insureds that may be covered by such contracts. The Government may also prescribe any standard applicable to those contracts. When Bill 82 was introduced for adoption, the Minister of Finance seemed to suggest that the categories that would benefit would be public companies and liability insurance for directors and officers. Although small and medium-sized enterprises are not covered by the Draft Regulation, it does provide for several categories of insureds that may benefit from exemptions. Draft Regulation – covered categories The Draft Regulation appears to cover “any liability insurance contract,” but sets out conditions that must be met by an insured in order to benefit from exemptions. Finally, many businesses and their directors and officers will be entitled to subscribe to policies that do not comply with articles 2500 and 2503 CCQ. Here is a summary of exemptions:  Section 1 Category of insured Drug manufacturers under the Act respecting prescription drug insurance; Certain corporations incorporated under a private bill;1 and Directors, officers and trustees of such businesses, except for their activities as members of a pension committee. Exemptions These insureds may subscribe to policies that depart from the rules set out in article 2500 CCQ and those set out in the first and second paragraphs of article 2503 CCQ.2 Section 2 Category of insured Companies not referred to in section 1, but meeting one of the following conditions “where the total coverage under all the civil liability insurance contracts subscribed by that insured is at least $5,000,000”: Large businesses for the purpose of the Act respecting the Québec sales tax; that is, businesses that have total taxable sales in a given fiscal year in excess of $10 million; A reporting issuer or subsidiary of such reporting issuer within the meaning of the Securities Act; A foreign business corporation within the meaning of the Taxation Act (chapter I-3) or the Income Tax Act; that is, a company that is not resident in Canada; and A corporation that pursues an activity outside Canada and derives income from that activity. Directors, officers and trustees of such businesses, except for their activities as members of a pension committee. Exemptions These insureds may subscribe to policies that depart from the rules set out in article 2500 CCQ and those set out in the first and second paragraphs of article 2503 CCQ. Section 3 Category of insured Businesses not referred to in sections 1 and 2 that conduct activities to provide services provided for in the Act respecting health services and social services as: An intermediate resource not referred to in the Act respecting the representation of family-type resources and certain intermediate resources and the negotiation process for their group agreements (chapter R-24.0.2) and who is a support for elderly autonomy-type resource; A private seniors’ residence; or A private health and social services institution operating a residential and long-term care centre or rehabilitation centre. Directors, officers and trustees of such businesses, except for their activities as members of a pension committee. Exemptions These insureds may subscribe to policies that depart from the rules set out in article 2500 CCQ and those set out in the second paragraph of article 2503 CCQ only. Section 4 Category of insured Businesses that are not covered by section 2, for example because they do not have total coverage of at least $5,000,000, and that have operations outside of Canada and earn income from them. However, exemptions are possible only for coverage of these foreign activities. Policies covering the Canadian operations of businesses must comply with the rules set out in the public interest.   Exemptions These insureds may purchase policies that depart from the rules set out in article 2500 CCQ and those set out in the first and second paragraphs of article 2503 CCQ. Section 6 Category of insured Businesses not referred to in any of sections 1 to 3 having primary liability insurance contracts in accordance with the provisions of articles 2500 and 2503 CCQ, covering legal costs and expenses resulting from actions against them, including those of the defence, and interest on the proceeds of the insurance. Exemptions These insureds may subscribe to complementary policies that depart from the rules set out in article 2500 CCQ and those set out in the first and second paragraphs of article 2503 CCQ. The Draft Regulation also stipulates that where an insurance policy does not provide for an obligation for an insurer to assume an insured’s defence (first paragraph of article 2503 CCQ), the insured retains the right to select counsel, but must keep the insurer informed of the progress of the proceedings and allow it to participate in the defence. Finally, the government, in article 8 of the Draft Regulation, provides that the proceeds of the insurance that are not applied exclusively to the payment of injured third parties may not exceed 50% of the proceeds of the insurance, unless the insured is found not to be liable or unless the payments to injured third parties do not reach such 50%. However, where a minimum amount of liability insurance coverage is required by law, that amount must be applied in full to the payment of injured third parties without regard to the exceptions discussed above. What to expect While some will welcome the government’s openness in allowing policyholders and insurers to relax certain obligations that may have contributed to a tightening insurance market in Quebec, others will fear the consequences that these changes may have, in particular on the availability of “non-exempt” insurance policies for insureds covered by the Draft Regulation.  In any case, this is a significant change that will generate much discussion between risk managers, market intermediaries and underwriters.  Also, some may be interested in obtaining additional information or commenting on the Draft Regulation. Information requests may be directed to the Direction générale du droit corporatif et des politiques relatives au secteur financier, Ministère des Finances, and comments may be made in writing to the attention of the Minister of Finance before October 23, 2021. Do not hesitate to contact a member of Lavery’s insurance team in connection with the above. Act constituting Capital régional et coopératif Desjardins (C-6.1), Act to establish Fondaction, le Fonds de développement de la Confédération des Syndicats Nationaux pour la Coopération et l'emploi (F-3.1.2) and Act to establish the Fonds de solidarité des travailleurs du Québec (F-3.2.1). As reproduced above, the first paragraph of article 2500 CCQ concerns the insurer’s obligation to assume the defence of the insured with respect to covered claims, and the second paragraph specifies that the insurer assumes the legal costs, interest and expenses, over and above the proceeds of the insurance.

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  4. Insurer’s Duty to Defend: The Court Rules in a Case of Contractual Breach

    The question of insurers’ duty to defend is back in the spotlight. On March 18, 2021, the Superior Court once again considered the issue in its application of the law to facts relevant to the dispute.1 Facts In April 2016, Cégerco Inc. (“Cégerco”), a general contractor, retained the services of Construction Placo Inc. (“Placo”) for the supply and installation of exterior cladding made of metal wall panels, which were manufactured by Kingspan Insulated Panels Ltd. (“Kingspan”). On May 24, 2017, Cégerco resiliated its contract with Placo on the grounds that Placo had caused numerous delays to the work schedule. Placo therefore instituted proceedings against Kingspan to recover sums advanced to the company, and against Cégerco for the damages resulting from the resiliation of the contract. Kingspan and Cégerco filed cross-applications, alleging non-performance by Placo. Faced with these cross-applications, Placo turned to its insurer for it to take up its defence.   However, the insurer adopted the position that it had no obligation to defend Placo or accept its insurance claim. Placo then applied to the Superior Court by way of an Wellington type application to have the insurer take up its defence in the dispute opposing it to Cégerco and Kingspan. Reasons After briefly reviewing the principles of Wellington type applications and the Supreme Court’s teachings in the landmark Progressive Homes2 decision, the Court concluded that the damages claimed in Kingspan’s cross-application did not arise from material damage or a loss. It did not dwell on this question any further, judging that insurance coverage did not apply. The Court then addressed Cégerco’s cross-application. Here again, it held that the damages claimed were not the result of material damage within the meaning of the insurance policy. Thus, after having analyzed Cégerco’s breakdown of damages claimed, it concluded that the sums represented monetary damage resulting from the fact that Placo had failed to fulfill its obligation to deliver compliant panels.  The Court further noted that [translation] “monetary losses related to defective or non-compliant products” did not fall within the scope of the commercial liability insurance’s coverage. The Court drew a distinction between the facts of this case and those of Progressive Homes cited above,3pointing out that the issue here was simply the non-performance of a contract. The Court held that the panels could not be the cause of the material damage that Cégerco suffered, as they had not been installed on the building, and that the material damage [translation] “rather resulted from a normal, if not foreseeable, incident that could have occurred in the normal course of any business.” Thus, according to the Court, although Cégerco was bound to take steps to remedy the delay in the delivery of the panels, and that such steps may have resulted in damage to the structure, Placo’s breach of contract did not result in a loss that would make insurance coverage applicable. For these reasons, the Court dismissed the plaintiff’s Wellington type application and that of the cross-applicant Placo. Conclusion What this decision means is that although an insurer’s duty to defend arises as soon as there is a possibility that material damage claimed falls within the scope of an insurance policy’s coverage, monetary damage suffered purely as a result of a breach of contract is not a sufficient legal basis for triggering an insurer’s duty to defend. Construction Placo inc. c. Kingspan Insulated Panels Ltd., 2021 QCCS 1230 Progressive Homes Ltd. v. Lombard General Insurance Co. of Canada, 2010 SCC 33. [2010] 2 SCR 245. Id.

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  1. The Best Lawyers in Canada 2023 recognize 67 lawyers of Lavery

    Lavery is pleased to announce that 67 of its lawyers have been recognized as leaders in their respective fields of expertise by The Best Lawyers in Canada 2023. The following lawyers also received the Lawyer of the Year award in the 2023 edition of The Best Lawyers in Canada: René Branchaud : Natural Resources Law Chantal Desjardins : Intellectual Property Law Bernard Larocque : Legal Malpractice Law Patrick A. Molinari : Health Care Law   Consult the complete list of Lavery's lawyers and their fields of expertise: Josianne Beaudry : Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Mining Law Laurence Bich-Carrière : Class Action Litigation / Corporate and Commercial Litigation / Product Liability Law Dominic Boivert : Insurance Law (Ones To Watch) Luc R. Borduas : Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law Daniel Bouchard : Environmental Law Laurence Bourgeois-Hatto : Workers' Compensation Law René Branchaud : Mining Law / Natural Resources Law / Securities Law Étienne Brassard : Equipment Finance Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Real Estate Law Jules Brière : Aboriginal Law / Indigenous Practice / Administrative and Public Law / Health Care Law Myriam Brixi : Class Action Litigation Benoit Brouillette : Labour and Employment Law Richard Burgos : Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Corporate Law Marie-Claude Cantin : Insurance Law / Construction Law Brittany Carson : Labour and Employment Law Eugene Czolij : Corporate and Commercial Litigation France Camille De Mers : Mergers and Acquisitions Law (Ones To Watch) Chantal Desjardins : Intellectual Property Law Jean-Sébastien Desroches : Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law Raymond Doray : Privacy and Data Security Law / Administrative and Public Law / Defamation and Media Law Christian Dumoulin : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Alain Y. Dussault : Intellectual Property Law Isabelle Duval : Family Law Chloé Fauchon : Municipal Law (Ones To Watch) Philippe Frère : Administrative and Public Law Simon Gagné : Labour and Employment Law Nicolas Gagnon : Construction Law Richard Gaudreault : Labour and Employment Law Danielle Gauthier : Labour and Employment Law Julie Gauvreau : Intellectual Property Law Michel Gélinas : Labour and Employment Law Caroline Harnois : Family Law / Family Law Mediation / Trusts and Estates Marie-Josée Hétu : Labour and Employment Law Alain Heyne : Banking and Finance Law Édith Jacques : Energy Law / Corporate Law Pierre Marc Johnson, Ad. E.  : International Arbitration Marie-Hélène Jolicoeur : Labour and Employment Law Isabelle Jomphe : Intellectual Property Law Guillaume Laberge : Administrative and Public Law Jonathan Lacoste-Jobin : Insurance Law Awatif Lakhdar : Family Law Bernard Larocque : Professional Malpractice Law / Class Action Litigation / Insurance Law / Legal Malpractice Law Myriam Lavallée : Labour and Employment Law Guy Lavoie : Labour and Employment Law / Workers' Compensation Law Jean Legault : Banking and Finance Law / Insolvency and Financial Restructuring Law Carl Lessard : Workers' Compensation Law / Labour and Employment Law Josiane L'Heureux : Labour and Employment Law Despina Mandilaras : Construction Law / Corporate and Commercial Litigation (Ones To Watch) Hugh Mansfield : Intellectual Property Law Zeïneb Mellouli : Labour and Employment Law Patrick A. Molinari : Health Care Law André Paquette : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Luc Pariseau : Tax Law Ariane Pasquier : Labour and Employment Law Jacques Paul-Hus : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Hubert Pepin : Labour and Employment Law Martin Pichette : Insurance Law / Professional Malpractice Law Élisabeth Pinard : Family Law François Renaud : Banking and Finance Law / Structured Finance Law Judith Rochette : Insurance Law / Professional Malpractice Law Ian Rose FCIArb : Director and Officer Liability Practice / Insurance Law Chantal Saint-Onge : Corporate and Commercial Litigation (Ones To Watch) Éric Thibaudeau : Workers' Compensation Law André Vautour : Corporate Governance Practice / Corporate Law / Information Technology Law / Intellectual Property Law / Technology Law Bruno Verdon : Corporate and Commercial Litigation Sébastien Vézina : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Yanick Vlasak : Corporate and Commercial Litigation Jonathan Warin : Insolvency and Financial Restructuring Law These recognitions are further demonstration of the expertise and quality of legal services that characterize Lavery’s professionals.

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  2. Five Lavery lawyers named as rising stars in the legal profession by Best Lawyers in 2023

    On August 25, 2022, Best Lawyers in Canada released the results of a new initiative to recognize the rising stars in the Canadian legal profession. The results of the Ones to Watch survey that was held among the Canadian legal community identified four Lavery lawyers as rising stars in their respective fields of expertise: Dominic Boisvert : Insurance Law France Camille De Mers : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Chloé Fauchon : Municipal Law Despina Mandilaras : Construction Law / Corporate and Commercial Litigation Chantal Saint Onge : Corporate and Commercial Litigation These recognitions are further demonstration of the expertise and quality of legal services that characterize Lavery's professionals.

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  3. Lavery appoints six new partners

    Lavery is pleased to welcome the following professionals as partners in the firm: Dominic Boisvert France Camille De Mers Catherine Deslauriers Chloé Fauchon Pier-Olivier Fradette Marie-Eve Pomerleau These talented lawyers who are rising to the rank of partner have shown a strong commitment to the firm and the profession in recent years, and they brilliantly embody Lavery’s values: Excellence, Collaboration, Audacity and Entrepreneurship. “We offer them our congratulations on this significant achievement in their legal careers. The diversity in background of our new partners is a testament to the depth of our 360° service offering and our desire to be a growth partner for companies doing business in Quebec”, said Anik Trudel, Lavery’s Chief Executive Officer.

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  4. Three Lavery lawyers named as rising stars in the legal profession by Best Lawyers

    On August 26, 2021, Best Lawyers in Canada released the results of a new initiative to recognize the rising stars in the Canadian legal profession. The results of the Ones to Watch survey that was held among the Canadian legal community identified three Lavery lawyers as rising stars in their respective fields of expertise: Dominic Boisvert: Insurance Law Charles Ceelen-Brasseur: Corporate Law Chloé Fauchon: Municipal Law These recognitions are further demonstration of the expertise and quality of legal services that characterize Lavery’s professionals.

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