Chantal Desjardins Partner, Lawyer and Trademark Agent

Bureau

  • Montréal

Phone number

514 397-7605

Fax

514 871-8977

Bar Admission

  • Québec, 1985

Languages

  • English
  • French

Profile

Partner | Lawyer - Trade-mark Agent

Chantal Desjardins is a partner, lawyer and trade-mark agent in Lavery’s intellectual property group. She contributes actively to the development of her clients’ rights in this field, which includes the protection of trade-marks, industrial designs, copyright, trade secrets, domain names and other related forms of intellectual property, in order to promote her clients’ business goals.

Me Desjardins provides legal advice and expertise with respect to protecting and managing IP assets, represents her clients in the examination of applications, opposition proceedings, and litigation in Canada and in other countries. She negotiates IP licences, various contracts in the field, and technology transfers, advises and defends clients’ rights in the field of advertising and labelling and other topics such as the Charter of the French language. She regularly provides guidance to clients on IP issues implicated in new and existing products and services. She is involved in the IP due diligence review of transactions. She regularly gives conferences, seminars and courses and publishes articles on intellectual property matters and participated on the advisory board of the Trademarks Office regarding the reform in trademark law and its implementation.

Publications

  • Text Reviser of two articles published in the “Revue francophone de la propriété intellectuelle” by l’Association francophone de la propriété intellectuelle, ECTA special number, December 2017
  • “La notion d’emploi en marques de commerce“, Québec Bar, November 2016
  • “Procédure de radiation des enregistrements de marques”, Barreau du Québec, Montreal, November 2011
  • “Marques sous haute surveillance”, Barreau du Québec, Montreal, November 2008
  •  “Are we speaking the same language”, INTA Annual Meeting, Toronto, May 2006
  • “Licence de marques de commerce, Survol des décisions administratives et judiciaires récentes”, Développements récents en droit de la propriété intellectuelle, Vol. 215, 2004
  • Keep an eye on how others use your trade-mark: a simple authorization is generally not enough!”, Newsletter GGData, Vol. 4, No. 4, December 2004
  • "Le contrôle en droit canadien des marques de commerce et un second regard sur l’article 50”, Les Cahiers de Propriété Intellectuelle, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2001
  • Infringement of Trade-marks Relating to Products on a Website”, Newsletter GGData, Vol. 1, No. 5, December 2001
  • Drawing the Line Between Comparative Advertising and Third Party Use: Canada”, International Trademark Association, San Antonio, Texas, United States, 1997
  • Coates, M. A., Desjardins, C., McGurhill, G.,”Canadian Trademark Practice and Procedure”, International Trademark Association, Practice Paper No. 3, 1993.
  • "Les derniers développements jurisprudentiels dans le droit des marques”, Continuing Education Department, Québec Bar, 1991
  • Desjardins, C., Tremblay, C., “Aide-Mémoire. Marques de commerce”, Wilson & Lafleur, 1990
  • “Pourquoi conserver l’article 49 dans la Loi sur les marques de commerce?” 2 C.I.P.R. 295, 1986

Conferences

  • The year in review- trade-marks, Webinar, Intellectual Property Institute of Canada, February 2018
  • “Top IP Cases of the year (trademarks)”, Intellectual Property Institute of Canada, Annual meeting, Niagara Falls, October 2017
  • President and Moderator of the Trade-mark Practitioners Group (RPM) , Canadian Chapter of the APRAM Association, conferences since January 2013, including the following subjects: “Classification de Nice”, “Utilisation permise de marques de tiers”, “Problèmes de contrefaçon sur internet: les recours au Canada et en France à l’égard des intermédiaires et des contrefacteurs”, “Quelle est la valeur d’un enregistrement de marque de commerce dans le cadre d’un litige?”, “Contrefaçon de marques de commerce et recouvrement de dommages-intérêts ou de profits : à qui le choix?”“Système de  Madrid: système d’enregistrement international de marques et la classification internationale”, “Marque ‘ordinaire’ à trois dimensions et signe distinctif”, “Charte de la langue française: Dispositions relatives aux marques de commerce”, etc.
  • “Les considérations linguistiques en rapport avec le droit des marques”. Faculty of Law, University of Montreal, December 2016
  • “La propriété intellectuelle : quels avantages peut-elle vous offrir?”, conference to students in fashion design, Marie-Victorin College, Montreal, 2014, 2015 and 2016
  • “Les Rudiments de la Propriété Intellectuelle”, Association des juristes italo-canadiens, Montreal, Novembre 2015
  • “La propriété intellectuelle comme actif d’entreprise”, Hautes Études Commerciales (HEC), Montreal, April 2012
  • “La propriété intellectuelle comme actif d’entreprise”, presented to a group of Legal Professionals, Montreal, February 2012
  • “Procédure de radiation des enregistrements de marques”,  Québec Bar : “Les développements récents en droit de la propriété intellectuelle”, Montreal, November 2011
  • How to win the speed-dating by protecting packaging or Protecting packaging in Canada”, 2010 FICPI ABC Meeting, Ottawa, June 2010
  • “Panel sur la pratique en droit des marques Canada-U.S.”, Association des Praticiens du Droit des Marques et des Modèles (APRAM), Paris, France, September 2009
  • «L’Ère post jeux et fête», The Canadian Institute, Montreal, November 2008
  • “Noms de produits de santé à présentation et à consonance semblables”, Regroupement des praticiens du droit des marques de commerce (RPM), Montreal, June 2008
  • Les chemins de la réussite d’une carrière/trouver sa passion : Prendre des risques”, Career Women Interaction, Montreal, September 2007
  • “Droits des marques et modèles au Canada et aux États-Unis”, Association des Praticiens du Droit des Marques et des Modèles (APRAM), Paris, France, June 2007
  • Le point sur les exigences en matière de licences de marques de commerce au Canada : comment faut-il gérer l’utilisation de la marque par d’autres entreprises (y compris à l’intérieur du même regroupement) pour éviter de compromettre leur validité”, Regroupement des praticiens du droit des marques de commerce (RPM), Montreal, April 2007
  • Conflicts : Where and how to draw the line”, Intellectual Property Institute of Canada 80th Annual Meeting, St. Andrews-by-the-Sea, New Brunswick, September 2006
  • Are we speaking the same language”, International Trademark Association Annual Meeting Toronto, May 2006
  • President of the second day at the forum on the “Women Leadership”, Canadian Institute, April 2006
  • “Women and Technology”, “Understanding the current issues”, Career Women Interaction, Montreal, Quebec, February 2006
  • Moderator at the “INTA Emerging Issues Forum”, Savannah, Georgia, February 2006
  • “Pourquoi s’attarder au territoire alors que nous sommes tous citoyens du village global?”, The Canadian Institute, Montreal, June 2005
  • “Les licences en marques : une interprétation sclérosée ?” Canadian Bar Association, October 2002
  • “Mock cross-examination”, Bi-annual meeting of the Canadian Institute of Intellectual Property, Ottawa, March 2002
  •  Honorary President of the VIth “Forum québécois pour les femmes-cadres” organized by the “Institut International de Recherche”, January 2001
  • “Les aspects légaux de la propriété intellectuelle”, presented at the Centre de recherche informatique de Montréal (CRIM), November 2000
  • Intellectual Property in the New Millenium. Non-Traditional Trade-marks. Animated Trade-marks and Two-Dimensional Get-Up”, Annual Meeting , Intellectual Property Institute of Canada, Quebec City, September 1999
  • Deontology in intellectual property practise”, Intellectual Property Institute of Canada, Montreal, November 1997
  • Drawing the Line Between Comparative Advertising and Third Party Use: Canada”, International Trade-Mark Association, Annual Meeting, San Antonio, Texas, United States, May 1997
  • “L’avenir de l’adhésion du Canada aux conventions internationales”, Quebec City, 1996
  • “The knock-off”, conference organized in conjunction with Goudreau Gage Dubuc and Martineau Walker, Montreal, 1995
  • “Le licensing au Canada”, IRPI Henri-Desbois Intellectual Property Research Institute and Paris Chamber of Commerce, Paris, France, 1994
  • “Les derniers développements jurisprudentiels dans le droit des marques”, Service de la formation permanente, Quebec Bar Association, Montreal, 1991
  • “Pourquoi conserver l’article 49 dans la Loi sur les marques de commerce?”, London, Ontario, 1986
  • Workshops on the basic and advanced courses relating to trade-marks. Courses organized by McGill University and the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada
  • Roundtable guest speaker on various intellectual property subjects for the International Trademark Association
  • Training sessions on trade-marks, copyrights, trade secrets and related topics for various clients and audience

Professional and community activities

  • Fondation du Conservatoire de musique et d’art dramatique du Québec
    • Board member, since 2017
  • Trois Tristes Tigres (theater company)
    • Board member, since 2016 and vice-president of the Board since 2017
  • Fondation du Centre des auteurs dramatiques (CEAD)
    • Board Member, 2009-2014
  • Fund raising Ambassador for the Fondation du Conservatoire de musique et d’art dramatique, 2016
  • Member of the Board, Chœur de chambre du Québec, 2013-2015

Distinctions

  • The Best Lawyers in Canada, 13th Edition
  • The Canadian Legal LEXPERT® Directory in the field of Intellectual Property, depuis 2016
  • World Trademark Review 1000
    • Leading Trademark Professionals (since 2011)
  • Who’s Who Legal: Canada
    • Leading Trademark Practitioner (since 2010)
  • The International Who’s Who of Trademarks Lawyers
    • Leading Practitioner (since 2011)
  • The Best Lawyers in Canada, Lawyer of the Year, Intellectual Property, 2020
Best Lawyers 2022 Lexpert 2022

Education

  • Diploma in Notarial law, Université de Montréal, 1980
  • L.L.L., Université de Montréal, 1979

Boards and Professional Affiliations

  • Member of Lavery’s Board of Directors
  • Canadian Bar Association
    • Member of Council of CBA-Québec, 2008
    • Member of the Organizing Committee of 2003 Annual Meeting
  • Co-managing Director of the intellectual property firm Goudreau Gage Dubuc 2006-2018
  • Québec Bar
    • Member of the managing partners task force on Panorama project (ethnocultural equality in the profession), 2016
    • Member of the managing partners task force on Justicia project (equality for the advancement of women in the profession), 2013-2016
  • Intellectual Property Institute of Canada (IPIC)-Fellow member-
    • Member of the Industrial Design Committee, 2008
    • Member of the Madrid Protocol Liaison Committee, 2004-2006
    • Member of the Education Committee, 1998-1999
    • Director of the Advanced Course on Trade-marks offered by the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada and McGill University, 1998
    • Assistant-Director of the Advanced Course on Trade-marks offered by the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada and McGill University, 1997
    • Member of the Trade-mark Practices Committee, 1996-1997
  • Association des Praticiens du droit des Marques et des Modèles (APRAM)
    • President of APRAM Canada Commission, since January 2013
  • Regroupement des praticiens en marques de commerce (RPM)
    • President, since January 2013
  • International Trademark Association (INTA)
    • Member of the Forum Committee, 2005
    • Member of the Roundtable Committee, 1998-2000
    • Member of the Planning Committee, 1996-1997
    • Member of the Legislative Analysis Committee, 1996
    • Member of the Publication Committee, 1990-1993
  • Fédération des chambres de commerce du Québec
    • Member of the manufacturer, innovation and exportationcommittee, 2016-
  • Member of International Strategist, a multidisciplinary task force supporting exporting companies
  • Board of Trade Metropolitan Montreal
    • 2002 – President ex-officio of the Business Women in Action committee
    • 2000 – 2002 – President of Business Women in Action
    • 1998 – Vice-President of the reading committee and Member of the Executive Committee of Business Women in Action
    • 1997 – 1999 – Member of the Organizing Committee of the Networking Dinner of Business Women in Action
  • European Communities Trade Mark Association (ECTA)
  • Former Assistant Editor for the “Canadian Legislative Report” and responsible for the synopsis for the Quebec legislations
  • College of Patent Agents and Trademark Agents (CPATA)
  1. Ten things you should know about the amendments to Quebec’s Charter of the French language

    Quebec recently enacted Bill 96, entitled An Act respecting French, the official and common language of Québec, which aims to overhaul the Charter of the French language. Here are 10 key changes in this law that will impose significant obligations on businesses: As of June 1, 2025, businesses employing more than 25 people (currently the threshold is 50 people) for at least six months will be required to comply with various “francization”1 obligations. Businesses with between 25 and 99 employees may also be ordered by the Office québécois de la langue française (the OQLF)2 to form a francization committee. In addition, at the request of the OQLF, businesses may have to provide a francization program for review within three months. As of June 1, 2025, only trademarks registered in a language other than French (and for which no French version has been filed or registered) will be accepted as an exception to the general principle that trademarks must be translated into French. Unregistered trademarks that are not in French must be accompanied by their French equivalent. The rule is the same for products as well as their labelling and packaging; any writing must be in French. The French text may be accompanied by a translation or translations, but no text in another language may be given greater prominence than the text in French or be made available on more favourable terms. However, as of June 1, 2025, generic or descriptive terms included in a trademark registered in a language other than French (for which no French version has been registered) must be translated into French. In addition, as of June 1, 2025, on public signs and posters visible from outside the premises, (i) French must be markedly predominant (rather than being sufficiently present) and (ii) the display of trademarks that are not in French (for which no French version has been registered) will be limited to registered trademarks. As of June 1, 2022, businesses that offer goods or services to consumers must respect their right to be informed and served in French. In the event of breaches of this obligation, consumers have the right to file a complaint with the OQLF or to request an injunction unless the business has fewer than five employees. In addition, any legal person or company that provides services to the civil administration3 will be required to provide these services in French, including when the services are intended for the public. As of June 1, 2022, subject to certain criteria provided for in the bill, employers are required to draw up the following written documents in French: individual employment contracts4 and communications addressed to a worker or to an association of workers, including communications following the end of the employment relationship with an employee. In addition, other documents such as job application forms, documents relating to working conditions and training documents must be made available in French.5 As of June 1, 2022, employers who wish to require employees to have a certain level of proficiency in a language other than French in order to obtain a position must demonstrate that this requirement is necessary for the performance of the duties related to the position, that it is impossible to proceed using internal resources and that they have made efforts to limit the number of positions in their company requiring knowledge of a language other than French as much as possible. As of June 1, 2023, parties wishing to enter into a consumer contract in a language other than French, or, subject to various exceptions,6 a contract of adhesion that is not a consumer contract, must have received a French version of the contract before agreeing to it. Otherwise, a party can demand that the contract be cancelled without it being necessary to prove harm. As of June 1, 2023, the civil administration will be prohibited from entering into a contract with or granting a subsidy to a business that employs 25 or more people and that does not comply with the following obligations on the use of the French language: obtaining a certificate of registration, sending the OQLF an analysis of the language situation in the business within the time prescribed, or obtaining an attestation of implementation of a francization program or a francization certificate, depending on the case. As of June 1, 2023, all contracts and agreements entered into by the civil administration, as well as all written documents sent to an agency of the civil administration by a legal person or by a business to obtain a permit, an authorization or a subsidy or other form of financial assistance must be drawn up exclusively in French. As of September 1, 2022, a certified French translation must be attached to motions and other pleadings drawn up in English that emanate from a business or legal person that is a party to a pleading in Quebec. The legal person will bear the translation costs. The application of the provisions imposing this obligation has, however, been suspended for the time being by the Superior Court.7 As of September 1, 2022, registrations in the Register of Personal and Movable Real Rights and in the Land Registry Office, in particular registrations of securities, deeds of sale, leases and various other rights, must be made in French. Note that declarations of co-ownership must be filed at the Land Registry Office in French as of June 1, 2022. The lawyers at Lavery know Quebec’s language laws and can help you understand the impact of Bill 96 on your business, as well as inform you of the steps to take to meet these new obligations. Please do not hesitate to contact one of the Lavery team members named in this article for assistance. We invite you to consult the other articles concerning the modifications made to Quebec’s Charter of the French language: Trademarks and Charter of the French language: What can you expect from Bill 96? Amendments to the Charter of the French Language: Impacts on the Insurance Sector “Francization” refers to a process established by the Charter of the French language to ensure the generalized use of French in businesses. The OQLF is the regulatory body responsible for enforcing the Charter of the French language. The civil administration in this law includes any public body in the broad sense of the term. An employee who signed an individual employment contract before June 1, 2022, will have until June 1, 2023, to ask their employer to provide them with a French translation if the employee so wishes. If the individual employment contract is a fixed-term employment contract that ends before June 1, 2024, the employer is not obliged to have it translated into French at the request of the employee. Employers have until June 1, 2023, to have job application forms, documents related to work conditions and training documents translated into French if these are not already available to employees in French. Among these exceptions are employment contracts, loan contracts and contracts used in “relations with persons outside Quebec.” There seems to be a contradiction in the law with regard to individual employment contracts which are contracts of adhesion and for which the obligation to provide a French translation nevertheless seems to apply. Mitchell c. Procureur général du Québec, 2022 QCCS 2983.

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  2. Entrepreneurs and Intellectual Property: Avoid these 13 mistakes to protect yourself (Part 3 of 3)

    In the third and final entry of this three-part article series, we share with you the last set of intellectual property (IP)–related mistakes (mistakes #10 to #13) that we regularly see with startups. We hope you will find it useful for your business. Please be sure to read our first and second entries in this series, where we go over mistakes #1 to #5 and #6 to #9, respectively. Happy reading! Part 3 of 3 Mistake #10:       Assuming that your invention is unpatentable One common mistake we see business owners make is that they assume their technology is not patentable. This frequently applies to computer-related inventions, such as software. Even though there is no outright ban on patenting software in Canada, many inventors are under the impression that software is unpatentable. This is most likely due to the fact that many patent applications for computer-implemented inventions are initially refused because the Patent Office determines that the invention in question is merely a disembodied series of mental steps and/or a mathematical formula (both of which are not considered patentable subject matter). However, it is important to remember that, while certain types of subject matter are not patentable in Canada (e.g., disembodied mental steps and mathematical formulae, as mentioned above), that does not mean that technology involving such unpatentable subject matter (e.g., computer software) is completely void of patentability. Often, it simply means that another aspect of the technology should be the focus of the patent application. For example, with regard to computer-implemented inventions, one strategy to increase the likelihood of patentability is to draft the patent application in such a way so as to emphasize that the computer hardware is essential, or to draft the application in such a way that it is clear that the invention creates an output comprising discernible effects or changes (e.g.: this can be as simple as generating distinct groups in a classification method). It is also worth noting that many inventors are under the mistaken impression that a new piece of technology has to be all but revolutionary in order to be patentable. However, improvements over existing technology are also patentable as long as they are sufficiently new and inventive. Accordingly, it is important to speak to a patent agent to properly determine if and how your invention may be patented. Mistake #11:       Believing that your patent automatically gives you the right to use and/or commercialize your invention One common misconception regarding patents is that they give the owner thereof the right to use and/or commercialize the patented technology without fear of infringing third-party patents. However, what a patent actually does is allow its owner to exclude others from using and/or commercializing their patented technology. It is not a shield against potential infringement of third-party IP rights. For example, if you obtain a patent for a piece of technology you developed, that does not necessarily mean you have the right to use or commercialize that technology. Specifically, if your technology incorporates patented technology owned by another company, then that company can actually prevent you from using or commercializing your own invention. This is an important aspect of “patent protection” that all entrepreneurs should be aware of. Mistake #12:       Not informing yourself about the criteria for recognition as an inventor or owner of an invention, and not training your employees on these criteria Many types of intellectual property disputes can arise within a business. Most of the time, they are the result of misconceptions, such as: An employee believes they are the inventor of an invention, when they are not; An employee believes that as the inventor of an invention, they are necessarily entitled to consideration (monetary or otherwise); the invention belongs to them rather than to the company; they are free to use the invention, for example upon leaving the company to become a competitor; or An employer believes that their company can use the specific results of a researcher’s work obtained from a previous job. It’s easy to imagine how messy such issues can get! An ounce of prevention is certainly worth a pound of cure. Get informed! Also, clarify these issues with new employees as soon as you hire them, and set down in writing who will own the rights to intellectual property developed during the course of employment. A quick training session before such problems arise can set the record straight and avoid conflicts based on unrealistic expectations. Mistake #13:       Not having an intellectual property protection strategy After reading this three-part article, we hope you now have a better understanding of the importance of developing an intellectual property strategy for your company. While such strategies can be very complicated, we have provided three broad questions that you should consider at all times (not just when starting out).  What intellectual property is my company using? This first question tasks you with identifying intellectual property that your company uses. This would include any technology that you are using or selling; any brand names/logos; and any works you are currently using (e.g., logos, slogans, website layouts, website texts, pictures, brochures or computer programs). Is there a risk that I am infringing a third party’s IP? Once you have identified the above intellectual property, you should ask yourself if your activities might infringe a third party’s IP rights. Obtaining a response may involve the following: Hiring a patent agent to perform a freedom to operate search for any technology you plan on using. Hiring a lawyer specialized in IP to perform a trademark search and opinion for any brand names/logos you use, as well as to negotiate and prepare an assignment of IP rights. How can I expand my own IP portfolio? This question involves determining, for each piece of IP you have identified, if and how it can be protected. This can include asking yourself the following additional questions: Is any of the technology I use or commercialize worth protecting? If so, should I file a patent application or keep the technology a trade secret? In which countries do I want IP protection? Are any of my company’s brand names or logos worth protecting by filing a trademark application? What’s important is not necessarily that you protect each and every piece of intellectual property your company owns, but that you have properly evaluated your company’s IP and have come up with an effective strategy that suits your business. In order to properly optimize your company’s IP portfolio, we naturally recommend speaking with your IP professional, whether it be a patent agent, a trademark agent, or a lawyer. Conclusion Lavery’s intellectual property team would be happy to help you with any questions you may have regarding the above or any other IP issues. Why don’t you take a look at our Go Inc. start-up program? It aims to provide you with the legal tools you need as an entrepreneur so you can start your company on the right foot. Click on the following links to read the two previous parts. Part 1 | Part 2

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  3. IT services dispute: the Supreme Court considers the non-liability clause

    In IT service contracts, it is common to find non-liability clauses protecting companies that provide software and professional IT system implementation or integration services. Issue In Dispute Is such a contractual non-liability clause valid under Quebec civil law where a fundamental obligation is breached? In 6362222 Canada inc. v. Prelco inc., recently rendered, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the non-liability clause in question was freely negotiated between the parties and resulted from compromises made by both sides. It therefore had to be respected. The respondent “Prelco” mandated the appellant “Créatech” to supply software and provide services to implement an integrated management system, the purpose of which was to manage and track all operational services information found in a large number of databases. Further to the many recurring problems during the system implementation, Prelco decided to end its contractual relationship with Créatech and hired another company to render the system operational. Prelco then claimed damages from Créatech, while Créatech filed a counterclaim for the unpaid balance for the project from Prelco. This began a long legal battle, which ended in the Supreme Court. In its decision, the Supreme Court treated various arguments which, according to Prelco, would have precluded the application of the non-liability clause. The Court dismissed these arguments. Reaffirmation Of The Primacy Of Freedom Of Contract The Supreme Court of Canada held that the Civil Code is set out in such a way as to provide for parties’ freedom to contract and to strike a balance between the notion of public order and the principle of freedom of contract. In considering the applicable legal principles, the judges noted however that the principle of respect for the contractual will of the parties does have exceptions, for example in cases of gross negligence or intentional fault, where economic forces are unbalanced ( such as a contract between a merchant and a consumer), where adhesion contracts and other types of contracts, such as nominate contracts mentioned in the Civil Code are involved, or where exclusions cover liability for body or moral injury.  Conclusion From this decision, it appears beneficial for IT service providers or other service providers to choose to be governed by the Quebec regime in contracts where the parties negotiate a clause limiting or excluding liability.

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  4. Entrepreneurs and Intellectual Property: Avoid These Thirteen Mistakes to Protect Yourself (Part 2 of 3)

    In the second entry of this three-part article series, we share with you the next set of intellectual property (IP)–related mistakes (mistakes #6 to #9) that we regularly see with startups. We hope you will find it useful for your business. Please be sure to read our first entry in this series, where we go over mistakes #1 to #5. Happy reading! Part 2 of 3: Mistakes concerning trademarks, industrial designs, copyrights, and trade secrets Mistake #6: Launching your product on the market without having verified the availability of your trademark Choosing a trademark can be a long and expensive process. People sometimes focus on the attractive qualities of a trademark, forgetting that its primary function is to distinguish a company’s products or services from those of others. To properly fulfil this function, the trademark must not be confusing with other trademarks, trade names, and domain names. In order to avoid conflicts with existing rights, an availability search should be conducted prior to a trademark’s adoption and the launch of a new product, service, or business. Furthermore, it may not be possible to register a trademark if it doesn’t have certain necessary intrinsic qualities, and a trademark may not be usable if it conflicts with the rights of third parties. A search will make it possible to determine where your desired trademark stands in terms of these two aspects; if necessary, a different mark may need to be adopted. Conducting a pre-adoption trademark search may prevent you from having to change trademarks after sales have begun or after the marketing development of your products or services is underway. Redesigning your advertising campaign; modifying your documentation, website, and packaging; and developing a new marketing strategy to transfer and retain the goodwill surrounding your initial trademark will be an expensive task, taking up time that could have been invested elsewhere. Such a process also carries the risk of tarnishing your reputation or losing your goodwill. Mistake #7: Not having your software or graphic designer sign a copyright assignment Many people think that a copyright is intended to protect a work with exceptional artistic qualities. However, such thinking is erroneous. As long as a text, drawing, graphic design or computer program is a creation that required a certain amount of effort and is not a copy of an existing work, it constitutes a “work” and is automatically protected by copyright. As a general rule, in Canada, the author is the first copyright owner; thus, just because the work was created in exchange for remuneration doesn’t mean that its copyright was transferred. For a startup business owner to ensure that they own a copyright, they should ask the artist or author to sign a written transfer of copyrights, thereby ensuring that the business can publish and use the work as it sees fit. It is also important to have the author of a work sign a waiver of moral rights or to outline the terms and conditions that will apply to the work’s authorship and integrity. If these steps are omitted, you’ll be limited in the use of such works. They won’t be part of your assets and will therefore not increase the value of your portfolio. In addition, you’ll be dependent on the consent of the actual holders of the rights to commence actions for infringement, should that ever be necessary. Mistake #8: Not having your employees, officers, and contractors sign confidentiality agreements (before entering into a business relationship) The sooner the better! Your company should see to having an agreement intended to preserve the confidentiality of its information signed by all those whom it mandates to perform work that is significant for its development, including its employees. The type of information that can be protected is virtually unlimited; at a minimum, it includes information related to R&D, market studies, prototypes, ongoing negotiations, marketing research of any kind, and lists of target customers. Ideally, in an employer-employee relationship, when an employee or officer leaves, a company should make sure to remind them of the confidentiality obligations that will continue to apply despite the end of the relationship. Applying these principles reduces the risk that an employee or partner will publicly share or independently use your strategic information at your company’s expense. Mistake #9: Not protecting your original products’ shapes and ornamentation within the prescribed time limit Many are unaware of the benefits of protecting an object’s shape, form, and ornamentation through the Industrial Design Act, or they learn of such benefits too late. In Canada, such protection has two key requirements: The industrial design must not have been published more than one year before the date on which an application for registration is filed; and The protection must be acquired by registration to exist. This type of protection is more effective than one might think and should not be overlooked. For example, a search of the industrial design register will reveal how many industrial designs tech giants have obtained. Some industrial designs have even been the subject of high-profile disputes, including one between Apple and Samsung over the shape of tablets. Apple Inc. uses such protection to prevent the presence of competing products that copy its designs on the market. As an example, in Canada, the shape of the headphones shown below was protected in 2021 and the shape of the phone shown below was protected in late 2020. For more detail on the protection of each of these articles, see Registration 190073 and Registration 188401. Conclusion Lavery’s intellectual property team would be happy to help you with any questions you may have regarding the above or any other IP issues. Why don’t you take a look at our Go Inc. start-up program? It aims to provide you with the legal tools you need as an entrepreneur so you can start your company on the right foot! Click on the following links to read the two previous parts. Part 1 | Part 3

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  1. The Best Lawyers in Canada 2023 recognize 67 lawyers of Lavery

    Lavery is pleased to announce that 67 of its lawyers have been recognized as leaders in their respective fields of expertise by The Best Lawyers in Canada 2023. The following lawyers also received the Lawyer of the Year award in the 2023 edition of The Best Lawyers in Canada: René Branchaud : Natural Resources Law Chantal Desjardins : Intellectual Property Law Bernard Larocque : Legal Malpractice Law Patrick A. Molinari : Health Care Law   Consult the complete list of Lavery's lawyers and their fields of expertise: Josianne Beaudry : Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Mining Law Laurence Bich-Carrière : Class Action Litigation / Corporate and Commercial Litigation / Product Liability Law Dominic Boivert : Insurance Law (Ones To Watch) Luc R. Borduas : Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law Daniel Bouchard : Environmental Law Laurence Bourgeois-Hatto : Workers' Compensation Law René Branchaud : Mining Law / Natural Resources Law / Securities Law Étienne Brassard : Equipment Finance Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Real Estate Law Jules Brière : Aboriginal Law / Indigenous Practice / Administrative and Public Law / Health Care Law Myriam Brixi : Class Action Litigation Benoit Brouillette : Labour and Employment Law Richard Burgos : Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Corporate Law Marie-Claude Cantin : Insurance Law / Construction Law Brittany Carson : Labour and Employment Law Eugene Czolij : Corporate and Commercial Litigation France Camille De Mers : Mergers and Acquisitions Law (Ones To Watch) Chantal Desjardins : Intellectual Property Law Jean-Sébastien Desroches : Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law Raymond Doray : Privacy and Data Security Law / Administrative and Public Law / Defamation and Media Law Christian Dumoulin : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Alain Y. Dussault : Intellectual Property Law Isabelle Duval : Family Law Chloé Fauchon : Municipal Law (Ones To Watch) Philippe Frère : Administrative and Public Law Simon Gagné : Labour and Employment Law Nicolas Gagnon : Construction Law Richard Gaudreault : Labour and Employment Law Danielle Gauthier : Labour and Employment Law Julie Gauvreau : Intellectual Property Law Michel Gélinas : Labour and Employment Law Caroline Harnois : Family Law / Family Law Mediation / Trusts and Estates Marie-Josée Hétu : Labour and Employment Law Alain Heyne : Banking and Finance Law Édith Jacques : Energy Law / Corporate Law Pierre Marc Johnson, Ad. E.  : International Arbitration Marie-Hélène Jolicoeur : Labour and Employment Law Isabelle Jomphe : Intellectual Property Law Guillaume Laberge : Administrative and Public Law Jonathan Lacoste-Jobin : Insurance Law Awatif Lakhdar : Family Law Bernard Larocque : Professional Malpractice Law / Class Action Litigation / Insurance Law / Legal Malpractice Law Myriam Lavallée : Labour and Employment Law Guy Lavoie : Labour and Employment Law / Workers' Compensation Law Jean Legault : Banking and Finance Law / Insolvency and Financial Restructuring Law Carl Lessard : Workers' Compensation Law / Labour and Employment Law Josiane L'Heureux : Labour and Employment Law Despina Mandilaras : Construction Law / Corporate and Commercial Litigation (Ones To Watch) Hugh Mansfield : Intellectual Property Law Zeïneb Mellouli : Labour and Employment Law Patrick A. Molinari : Health Care Law André Paquette : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Luc Pariseau : Tax Law Ariane Pasquier : Labour and Employment Law Jacques Paul-Hus : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Hubert Pepin : Labour and Employment Law Martin Pichette : Insurance Law / Professional Malpractice Law Élisabeth Pinard : Family Law François Renaud : Banking and Finance Law / Structured Finance Law Judith Rochette : Insurance Law / Professional Malpractice Law Ian Rose FCIArb : Director and Officer Liability Practice / Insurance Law Chantal Saint-Onge : Corporate and Commercial Litigation (Ones To Watch) Éric Thibaudeau : Workers' Compensation Law André Vautour : Corporate Governance Practice / Corporate Law / Information Technology Law / Intellectual Property Law / Technology Law Bruno Verdon : Corporate and Commercial Litigation Sébastien Vézina : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Yanick Vlasak : Corporate and Commercial Litigation Jonathan Warin : Insolvency and Financial Restructuring Law These recognitions are further demonstration of the expertise and quality of legal services that characterize Lavery’s professionals.

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  2. Chantal Desjardins named Lawyer of the Year in Intellectual Property Law by The Best Lawyers in Canada 2023

    Lavery is pleased to announce that Chantal Desjardins's expertise in Intellectual Property Law was recognized with the Lawyer of the Year award as part of The Best Lawyers in Canada 2023. Chantal Desjardins is a partner, lawyer and trade-mark agent in Lavery's intellectual property group. She contributes actively to the development of her clients' rights in this field, which includes the protection of trade-marks, industrial designs, copyright, trade secrets, domain names and other related forms of intellectual property, in order to promote her clients' business goals. Me Desjardins provides legal advice and expertise with respect to protecting and managing IP assets, represents her clients in the examination of applications, opposition proceedings, and litigation in Canada and in other countries. She negotiates IP licences, various contracts in the field, and technology transfers, advises and defends clients' rights in the field of advertising and labelling and other topics such as the Charter of the French language. She regularly provides guidance to clients on IP issues implicated in new and existing products and services. She is involved in the IP due diligence review of transactions. She regularly gives conferences, seminars and courses and publishes articles on intellectual property matters and participated on the advisory board of the Trademarks Office regarding the reform in trademark law and its implementation.

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  3. Lexpert Recognizes Two Partners as Leading Technology Lawyers in Canada

    On June 16, 2022, Lexpert recognized the expertise of two of our partners in its 2022 Lexpert Special Edition: Technology. Chantal Desjardins and André Vautour now rank among Canada’s leaders in the area of technology law. Chantal Desjardins is a partner, lawyer and trade-mark agent in Lavery’s intellectual property group. She contributes actively to the development of her clients’ rights in this field, which includes the protection of trade-marks, industrial designs, copyright, trade secrets, domain names and other related forms of intellectual property, in order to promote her clients’ business goals. André Vautour practices in the fields of corporate and commercial law and is particularly interested in corporate governance, strategic alliances, joint ventures, investment funds and mergers and acquisitions of private corporations. He practises also in the field of technology law (drafting technology development and transfer agreements, licensing agreements, distribution agreements, outsourcing agreements, and e-commerce agreements).

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