Josiane L'Heureux Partner, Lawyer

Bureau

  • Montréal

Phone number

514 877-2954

Fax

514 871-8977

Bar Admission

  • Québec, 1998

Languages

  • English
  • French

Profile

Partner

Josiane L'Heureux is a partner at Lavery’s Montréal office and a member of the Labour and Employment group. She works for private and public employers of various fields such as pharmaceuticals, manufacturers, mining, telecommunications as well as the health and social services network.

Ms. L’Heureux is notably known for her ability to well evaluate often complex issues related to labour relations and her concrete approach aimed towards the clients’ needs. Recognized for her expertise, she is regularly called upon by upper management in businesses and institutions, both federal and provincial, to give advice in matters relating to labour contracts or their termination, certification, collective labour relations, occupational health and safety including the related penal complaints, human rights, as well as crisis management deriving from work conflicts or other mediatized clashes.

Ms. L’Heureux frequently represents employers’ interests before arbitration, civil, administrative and penal tribunals, and works actively with them towards the development of global business strategies, while encouraging a proactive and integrated approach. She acts before the Labour and Relations Board as well as the Canadian Industrial Relations Board, on matters relating to outsourcing, constitutional jurisdiction of tribunals, bad faith bargaining and complaints of unfair practices. She also acts before civil courts in matters relating to injunctions ensuring the application of non-competition and non-solicitation clauses in employment.

Ms. L’Heureux has also been a guest lecturer at numerous conferences, notably for the Canadian Association of Counsel to Employers, of which she is an active member. As a speaker, she is often invited to outline the most recent developments in labour law, which she also teaches at the Montréal Bar School.

In 2017, The Canadian Legal Lexpert® directory listed her in the field of Occupational Health and Safety Law.

Publications

  • Josiane L’Heureux, with the collaboration of Élodie Brunet and Judith Houle-Couture, “A corporation receives a hefty fine and two of its officers face jail time for violations of the Ontario occupational health and safety regulations” Need to Know Express - February 2015.
  • Josiane L’Heureux, with the collaboration of Élodie Brunet and Léonie Gagné, “A pregnant worker’s right to benefits in the event of preventive withdrawal pursuant to section 36 of the AROHS does not apply to a business under federal jurisdiction: Éthier v. Commission des lésions professionnelles” - Need to Know - July 2014.
  • Josiane L’Heureux, with the collaboration of Élodie Brunet and Léonie Gagné, “Right to refuse to work and preventive withdrawal: the Dionne v. Commission scolaire des Patriotes case”Need to Know - July 2014.
  • Josiane L’Heureux, with the collaboration of Élodie Brunet and Frédérique Duchesne,Notice to employers under federal jurisdiction: amendments to the Canada Labour Code will take effect on October 31, 2014”Need to Know - July 2014.
  • Josiane L’Heureux, with the collaboration of Élodie Brunet, “Recent Québec and Federal Law Developments in Occupational Health and Safety”, Canadian Association of Counsel to Employers (CACE), 11th Annual Conference, article of the speakers, June 20, 2014.
  • Josiane L’Heureux, with the collaboration of Élodie Brunet, “Criminal negligence: The Court of Appeal of Ontario increases to $750 000 the fine imposed on Metron Construction Corp.”Need to Know Express - September 2013.
  • Josiane L’Heureux and Élodie Brunet, “Recent Developments in the Case Law on Human Rights in the Employment Context in Quebec”, Canadian Association of Counsel to Employers (CACE), 9th Annual Conference, 2012.
  • Josiane L’Heureux and Élodie Brunet, La responsabilité accrue des administrateurs eu égard aux cotisations impayées à la Commission de la santé et de la sécurité du travail [Translation : “The Increased Liability of the Employer’s Directors with Regards to Unpaid Assessments to the CSST”], Revue Industrie & Commerce, 2011 [available in French only].
  • Josiane L’Heureux, with the collaboration of Vincent Metsä and Élodie Brunet, articling student, “Criminal negligence and industrial accidents: a review of the case law and comments on issues faced by employers” - Canadian Association of Counsel to Employers (CACE), 8th Annual Conference, 2011.
  • Josiane L’Heureux and Luc Pariseau, “Avoid a $15,000 fine for a first offence under the Act respecting occupational health and safety. Know your rights!” - Lavery Business - December 2010.

Distinctions

  • The Best Lawyers in Canada in the field of Labour and Employment Law, 2022
  • The Canadian Legal LEXPERT® Directory in the field of Occupational health and safety, since 2016
Best Lawyers 2022 Lexpert 2022

Education

  • LL.B., Université de Sherbrooke, 1997

Boards and Professional Affiliations

  • Canadian Association of Counsel to Employers (CACE) 
  • Réseau des femmes d’affaires du Québec
  1. Employer-sponsored holiday parties: What are you liable for?

    Your guests have arrived and it’s time to give the toast! Are you ready to celebrate? December is undoubtedly the most festive month of the year. It’s a great opportunity for employers to thank their employees for the services rendered during the year, but also for employees to interact with their colleagues in a relaxed atmosphere. With the parties just around the corner, it’s a good time to remind employers that maintaining the health, safety and dignity of all participants is crucial when organizing such events. Even in these happy times, the employer’s obligation to ensure the health and safety of employees extends beyond normal work hours and outside the regular work premises. Here are some tips to help you celebrate in a happy, respectful and safe atmosphere for all. Moderation is always in good taste First, preventing undesirable situations begins with controlling the consumption of alcohol and other substances that can cause impairment. As psychoactive products that directly and quickly affect brain function, excessive alcohol or cannabis consumption is certainly the main factor that can lead to misdemeanour during holiday parties. When employees participate in employer-sponsored activities, they attend as part of their job: they thus have the same status that they do when at work within the company1.  Consequently, employers retain their management and leadership powers during social events. Thus, they can sanction any misconduct committed during a social event. In order to limit alcohol consumption and reduce the risk of incidents, employers may, in particular: Distribute a limited number of alcohol vouchers; Stop serving alcohol a few hours before the event ends; Limit the open bar formula, if you have one, to a predetermined schedule. As for the use of cannabis and cigarettes, including e-cigarettes, it’s worth remembering that your guests must respect the smoking ban in or near the premises. Harassment prevention Though the movement concerning harassment has prompted employers to increase their efforts to prevent sexual misconduct in the workplace, the Act respecting labour standards already obliged employers, since 2002, to take reasonable action to prevent psychological harassment and, whenever they become aware of such behaviour, to put a stop to it2. Employers are not exempt from this obligation when they invite employees to a social event. A safe trip back home At the party’s end, employers should make sure their employees get home safely by providing ways to travel other than getting behind the wheel, including: Providing taxi vouchers to prevent road accidents caused by impaired driving; Reimbursing employee travel expenses; Encouraging employees to contact organizations offering driver services. Company holiday parties have become a must. Beyond employer obligations and responsibilities, such festivities are a great opportunity for employees to forge ties with their colleagues outside the more rigid work environment and for employers to show their appreciation and thank their employees. Happy festivities to all!   Association internationale des machinistes et des travailleuses et travailleurs de l'aérospatiale, district 140, section locale 2309 et Servisair (Avo Minassian), D.T.E. 2009T-448; Nettoyage de drains A. Ducharme (2000) inc. et Syndicat national des travailleuses et travailleurs de l’environnement (F.E.E.S.P.-C.S.N.), D.T.E. 2001T-1030. Sec. 81.19 A.L.S.

    Read more
  2. New developments regarding the criminal negligence of employers

    On August 31, 2017, the Ontario Court of Justice sentenced1 Detour Gold Corporation (“Detour Gold”) to pay a fine of $2,625,333 after it pleaded guilty to a charge of criminal negligence causing the death of an employee. Facts Detour Gold has operated an open pit mine near the Ontario-Québec border since 2013. In April 2015, the company tried several times to have a leach reactor repaired after noticing some leaks. On June 3, 2015, a Detour Gold millwright, Denis Millette, was assigned to repair a defective joint on the reactor. While doing the repair, the employee was exposed to sodium cyanide, a highly toxic substance used in the mining industry to extract gold from ore, that had leaked out from the reactor. The employee became ill and died. The autopsy results showed that his death was caused by sodium cyanide poisoning. On April 21, 2016, the company was charged with criminal negligence causing death under the Criminal Code,2 as well as with 15 counts under the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act.3 The company subsequently pleaded guilty to the criminal negligence charge in exchange for the charges under the Occupational Health and Safety Act being withdrawn. Decision The Court sentenced Detour Gold to pay a fine of $1.4 million, a victim fine surcharge of 30% ($420,000), and restitution to the deceased employee’s family in the amount of $805,333, the equivalent of the earnings he would have received until he retired. In its reasons, the Court found several instances of negligence on the part of Detour Gold, in particular, that the employee had had no training or information that would have enabled him to identify the signs of cyanide poisoning, the company had not ensured that the employee was wearing appropriate personal protective equipment, there was no clean-up procedure for sodium cyanide spills, and no one knew how to identify and treat cyanide poisoning. Referring to the recent judgments in Stave Lake Quarries Inc.4 and Metron Construction,5 the Court was of the opinion that the fine had to be significant, so that businesses would not view it as the ordinary cost of doing business,6 despite the fact that no criminal or penal charges had ever been filed against Detour Gold and the company had been experiencing deficits since it began operating in 2013. This $1,400,000 fine is the largest fine imposed on a company convicted of criminal negligence causing death.7 Note that six charges relating to violations of the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act8 are still pending against three Detour Gold supervisors. Other recent cases We would also draw your attention to several recent decisions in criminal negligence cases involving employers. In its decision dated October 27, 2016, in Stave Lake Quarries,9 the Provincial Court of British Columbia accepted the parties’ joint recommendation and sentenced the employer to pay a fine of $100,000, plus a victim fine surcharge of $15,000, following the death of an employee. The facts reveal that while carrying out a procedure on her second day on the job, an employee driving a truck used to haul rocks failed to use the parking brake when she stopped the truck. The air brakes failed and the employee died when the truck rolled over. In that case, the employer pleaded guilty to the charge of criminal negligence, primarily because it had failed to provide a rigourous system for hiring, training, and supervising. In another case, on July 21, 2017, the Court of Québec sentenced10 Century Mining Corp. to pay a fine of $200,000 for criminal negligence causing bodily harm, despite the fact that the company had declared bankruptcy in 2012. In that case, an employee doing drilling in a mine was crushed by a heavy truck; he suffered serious injuries and was blinded. The company was convicted of failing to identify the real risks in the situation and failing to inform the truck driver that drilling was underway. On the other hand, Ressources Métanor Inc.was acquitted11 on December 8, 2017, of criminal negligence causing death. A charge had been filed against the company as a result of an accident involving three employees who drowned in 2009 when the elevator car they were in descended to a level of the mine that was underwater. The facts revealed that the probes used to activate high water alarms had been disconnected and that a bolt in one of the pipes used to carry water underground was defective. In spite of those deficiencies, the Court found that Ménator’s officers had not shown wanton or reckless disregard. While certain deficiencies observed in the operations were contrary to the Act respecting occupational health and safety (“AOHS”),12 the evidence did not reveal that any person or organization was responsible for disconnecting the probes. We are also awaiting two criminal negligence decisions in the near future, in R. v. Fournier13 and R. v. CFG Construction inc.14 We would note that in 2016, in Fournier, the Superior Court of Québec dismissed15 the application for judicial review and, as did the judge who presided over the preliminary inquiry, allowed the charges of criminal negligence and involuntary manslaughter to proceed to trial. In that decision, the Superior Court concluded that a workplace death resulting from a violation of the AOHS could serve as the basis for an order to stand trial on a charge of manslaughter under the Criminal Code. We will be following this case with interest, because a conviction of an employer on a manslaughter charge resulting from a violation of occupational health and safety legislation would be a first. Conclusion Since Bill C-4516 was enacted in March 2004, making it easier to bring criminal negligence charges in cases involving workers’ health and safety, the number of convictions of employers has risen and the sentences imposed have skyrocketed. It is in employers’ interests to consider these court decisions as one more reason to enhance their prevention measures in order to ensure compliance with the applicable occupational health and safety legislation and thus fulfil their general duty to take appropriate measures to avoid injuries resulting from doing a job or performing a duty.   R.  v. Detour Gold,C.J.O., No. 0511-998-164537 / 0511-998-5380 (sentence August 31, 2017). Criminal Code, RSC 1985, c. C-46, sections 219 and 220. Occupational Health and Safety Act, RSO 1990, c. O.1. R. v. Stave Lake Quarries Inc., 2016 BCPC 377. R. v. Metron,2013 ONCA 541: see our comments on this decision here. See page 15 of the decision: “The fine must also be significant enough to not be considered as a simple cost of doing business”. We would note that in Metron, the employer was sentenced to pay a fine of $750,000. Charges against each of the supervisors for failing to supervise the employee and not ensuring that he was wearing personal protective equipment. Supra, note 5. R. v. Century Mining Corp., C.Q., No. 615-01-021168-136 (sentence July 21, 2017). R. v. Ressources Métanor inc., C.Q., No.625-01-003393-149 (conviction December 8, 2017). Act respecting occupational health and safety, CQLR c. S-2.1. R. v. Fournier, No. 500-01-088108-136. R. v. CFG Construction inc., No. 200-01-175428-139. Fournier v. R., 2016 QCCS 5456. An Act to amend the Criminal Code (criminal liability of organizations), Assented to on November 7, 2003, 2nd Sess., 37th Parl. (Can.). See our comments at the time on the passage of this bill here.

    Read more
  3. Investing in the health of your employees - a wise decision! The legal issues to consider

    Numerous studies confirm that the poor health of workers, among other things caused by the increasingly sedentary nature of positions and the illnesses associated with this, will ultimately result in significant costs for businesses related to: Absenteeism; Compensation for work-related injuries and illnesses and occupational health and safety prevention measures; and Resulting losses in productivity Many companies have attempted to remedy the situation by adopting programs that involve the installation of physical fitness rooms in the workplace. However, this solution, while commendable, does raise some legal issues for employers. Issues related to the use of sports facilities in the workplace The main issue facing a company when it makes sports facilities available to its employees is its potential liability in the event of an accident. The company’s liability The company must be prudent and diligent and take all reasonable precautions to prevent accidents, because if there has been any negligence or fault on its part, it could be held liable for such incidents. For example, the company could be held civilly liable for injuries suffered by an employee as the result of a defect in or poor maintenance of the exercise facilities made available to employees. The following are examples of some reasonable measures that a company could adopt to reduce its exposure to liability: Ensure that the facilities are safe and properly maintained; Provide employees with relevant information regarding the use of facilities; Require that employees complete a physical activity readiness questionnaire The risk of an event occurring while using the facilities may be compensable by the CNESST A worker injured while using sports facilities in the workplace can file a claim with the CNESST. Generally, the case law recognizes that an activity carried out in the context of a privilege granted by the employer constitutes a personal action for which the worker accepts the risks as well as the liability. However, some activities, while seemingly personal, may be recognized as being an accident occurring in the course of employment where the circumstances demonstrate a “connection” between the activity in question and the employment, or a “usefulness related to the worker’s activity and the accomplishment of his work”. Obviously, each case is unique and must be assessed on its particular facts. The following are a few practical recommendations that will allow an well-informed employer to limit its risks: It must be made clear to employees that the use of the employer’s sports facilities is voluntary, personal and not compulsory; The employer or its representatives should not exert any pressure on employees to use the facilities; Employees must be forbidden from using the facilities during paid working hours or while they are under the employer’s authority; Subject to very specific cases, the good physical condition of workers need not be assessed by medical examinations. Detail to consider It would be wise to inform insurers of the use of sports facilities in the workplace. Insurers can then assess the effects of such an activity on existing insurance coverage and propose any changes which may be required Conclusion Employers should not resist or impede the implementation of programs aimed at employee well-being or fitness. However, due to the risks inherent in such activities, employers should conduct an initial analysis of the conditions in which such programs should be implemented and put in place. The members of Lavery’s labour and employment law team would be pleased to assist you along the way

    Read more
  4. Reminder to employers : The deadline for complying with certain regulatory provisions for safe asbestos management expires June 6, 2015

    In Quebec, it is possible to find materials and products containing asbestos in civil engineering works, construction materials, facilities and equipment in all types of buildings, whether industrial, commercial, public or residential. According to various sources, the need to adopt new standards on safe asbestos management arose particularly due to the fact that a significant number of buildings in Quebec dating back to the end of the 1980s may contain asbestos and are probably in need of renovation. In addition, several statistical studies have shown that the majority of cases of death due to occupational diseases recognized by the CSST for workers aged 45 and up were caused by asbestos.1 It is in the context of this factual backdrop that the Regulation to Amend the Regulation Respecting Occupational Health and Safety and the Safety Code for the Construction Industry2 came into force on June 6, 2013. It provides for the addition of sections 69.1 to 69.17 to the Regulation Respecting Occupational Health and Safety3 (the “RROHS”) and, among other things, introduces new standards for safe asbestos management in order to reduce workers’ exposure to asbestos dust. In view of the approaching two-year deadline of June 6, 2015 given to employers to comply with their obligations for locating flocking and heat insulating materials,4 the purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of employers’ requirements under these new provisions of the RROHS. It should also be noted that the failure to comply with a provision of the Act Respecting Occupational Health and Safety5 (the “AROHS”) or any of its regulations can lead to regulatory liability.6 OBLIGATIONS RELATING TO FLOCKING AND HEAT INSULATING MATERIAL Under the new RROHS provisions, the employer, whether a tenant or owner of the workplace, is required to inspect every building built prior to February 15, 1990 to locate flocking, and every building built prior to May 20, 1999 to locate heat insulating material containing asbestos.7. “Flocking” is a mixture of friable materials which is sprayed over a surface, while “heat insulating material” is used as an insulator to cover a facility or equipment in order to protect against fire or to prevent heat loss.8 Flocking and heat insulating materials are presumed to contain asbestos in a concentration of at least 0.1%.9 The employer may however rebut this presumption by submitting verifiable documentary information or a sampling report in accordance with the criteria contained in the RROHS.10 Thus, the employer must conduct an initial inspection of flocking and heat insulating materials containing asbestos by June 6, 2015, and further inspections every two years thereafter, unless an exception applies.11 Such an inspection requires a [TRANSLATION] “careful examination” of the workplace.12 Where flocking or heat insulation material contains asbestos or is liable to produce asbestos dust emissions, the employer must, while taking into account the degradation and dispersal factors, remove it, enclose it entirely in a permanent structure resistant to fibres, coat it with or soak it in a binder, or cover it with materials resistant to fibres.13 REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS CONTAINING ASBESTOS Since June 6, 2013, prior to undertaking any work that is liable to produce asbestos dust emissions, the employer must check for the presence of asbestos in the materials and products likely to contain it, unless it can show that the work to be carried out is not liable to produce asbestos dust emissions, specifically by means of verifiable documentary information or a sampling report.14 Depending on the availability of information, the employer must also check for the presence of asbestos when purchasing those materials or products.15 We note however that the RROHS states that gypsum panels and joint compounds manufactured after January 1, 1980 are presumed not to contain asbestos.16 Where an interior finish likely to contain asbestos may emit dust because of its state, the employer must repair it or remove it, taking into account the degradation and dispersal factors.17 The employer must also take the necessary measures to control asbestos dust emissions before undertaking work on materials or products containing asbestos, including flocking and heat insulating material. In this respect, the Safety Code for the Construction Industry requirements apply.18 Finally, the employer must train and inform the workers of the risks, prevention and safe working methods relevant to the work to be done prior to undertaking work liable to produce asbestos dust emissions.19 REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO RECORDING AND DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION In addition, since June 6, 2013, the employer must keep a register containing the entries and documents required by the RROHS (including information on the inspection dates of the building, the location of flocking and heat insulating material, the nature of the work previously done and type of asbestos sampled) and make it available to the workers in the establishment and their representatives.20 As well, the employer must disclose the relevant entries in the register to any person who will be doing, or plans to do, work that could produce dust emissions, and that person must inform the workers who are likely to be exposed to asbestos dust.21 CONCLUSION Since this article only provides a brief overview of the new requirements for safe asbestos management, we would encourage employers to seek out additional information on these requirements, should they feel it is necessary. The authors are available to answer your questions. For any employers who may not yet have implemented these new requirements, they should act quickly in order to decrease the risk of facing potential regulatory liability in this regard. Lavery will keep you informed of any further significant developments. _________________________________________ 1 See, in particular, Équipe des études et analyses, Service de la statistique et de l’information de gestion, CSST, Portrait des lésions professionnelles chez les travailleurs de 55 ans et plus 2002-2011, March 2014, p. 34, online: http://www.csst.qc.ca/publications/200/Documents/DC200_1049_1web.pdf (site consulted April 21, 2015), “[TRANSLATION] A more detailed examination of occupational disease-related deaths between 2002 and 2011 demonstrates that 81% of such cases are due to asbestos (873 deaths)” and Équipe d’analyse, Service de la statistique, CSST, Portrait des lésions professionnelles chez les travailleurs de 45 ans et plus 1999-2008, May 2010, p. 38, online: http://www.csst.qc.ca/publications/200/Documents/DC200_1049web1.pdf (site consulted April 21, 2015), “Over the course of the last ten years studied, occupational disease-related deaths are mainly caused by asbestos (at least 7 out of 10 cases).” 2 (2013) GOQ II, 1999. 3 CQLR c S-2.1, r 13 (“RROHS”). 4 Regulation to Amend the Regulation Respecting Occupational Health and Safety and the Safety Code for the Construction Industry, supra, note 2, section 6. 5 CQLR c S-2.1 (“AROHS”). 6 We are referring, in particular, to section 236 of the AROHS. 7 RROHS, section 69.3. See also section 56 of the AROHS. 8 RROHS, section 69.1. 9 Ibid,, sections 69.2, 69.4 and 69.6. 10 Ibid,, sections 69.4 and 69.7. 11 Ibid,, section 69.8. 12 Commission de la santé et de la sécurité du travail, «Amiante», Foire aux questions (question 15), online: http://www.csst.qc.ca/prevention/theme/amiante/Pages/foire_aux_questions.aspx (site consulted April 21, 2015). 13 RROHS, section 69.9. 14 Ibid,, section 69.11. 15 Ibid. 16 Ibid,, section 69.10. 17 Ibid,, section 69.13. 18 Code de sécurité pour les travaux de construction, RLRQ c S-2.1, r 4; RSST, article 69.14. 19 RROHS, section 69.15. 20 Ibid,, section 69.16. 21 Ibid,, section 69.17.

    Read more
  1. The Best Lawyers in Canada 2023 recognize 67 lawyers of Lavery

    Lavery is pleased to announce that 67 of its lawyers have been recognized as leaders in their respective fields of expertise by The Best Lawyers in Canada 2023. The following lawyers also received the Lawyer of the Year award in the 2023 edition of The Best Lawyers in Canada: René Branchaud : Natural Resources Law Chantal Desjardins : Intellectual Property Law Bernard Larocque : Legal Malpractice Law Patrick A. Molinari : Health Care Law   Consult the complete list of Lavery's lawyers and their fields of expertise: Josianne Beaudry : Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Mining Law Laurence Bich-Carrière : Class Action Litigation / Corporate and Commercial Litigation / Product Liability Law Dominic Boivert : Insurance Law (Ones To Watch) Luc R. Borduas : Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law Daniel Bouchard : Environmental Law Laurence Bourgeois-Hatto : Workers' Compensation Law René Branchaud : Mining Law / Natural Resources Law / Securities Law Étienne Brassard : Equipment Finance Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Real Estate Law Jules Brière : Aboriginal Law / Indigenous Practice / Administrative and Public Law / Health Care Law Myriam Brixi : Class Action Litigation Benoit Brouillette : Labour and Employment Law Richard Burgos : Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Corporate Law Marie-Claude Cantin : Insurance Law / Construction Law Brittany Carson : Labour and Employment Law Eugene Czolij : Corporate and Commercial Litigation France Camille De Mers : Mergers and Acquisitions Law (Ones To Watch) Chantal Desjardins : Intellectual Property Law Jean-Sébastien Desroches : Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law Raymond Doray : Privacy and Data Security Law / Administrative and Public Law / Defamation and Media Law Christian Dumoulin : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Alain Y. Dussault : Intellectual Property Law Isabelle Duval : Family Law Chloé Fauchon : Municipal Law (Ones To Watch) Philippe Frère : Administrative and Public Law Simon Gagné : Labour and Employment Law Nicolas Gagnon : Construction Law Richard Gaudreault : Labour and Employment Law Danielle Gauthier : Labour and Employment Law Julie Gauvreau : Intellectual Property Law Michel Gélinas : Labour and Employment Law Caroline Harnois : Family Law / Family Law Mediation / Trusts and Estates Marie-Josée Hétu : Labour and Employment Law Alain Heyne : Banking and Finance Law Édith Jacques : Energy Law / Corporate Law Pierre Marc Johnson, Ad. E.  : International Arbitration Marie-Hélène Jolicoeur : Labour and Employment Law Isabelle Jomphe : Intellectual Property Law Guillaume Laberge : Administrative and Public Law Jonathan Lacoste-Jobin : Insurance Law Awatif Lakhdar : Family Law Bernard Larocque : Professional Malpractice Law / Class Action Litigation / Insurance Law / Legal Malpractice Law Myriam Lavallée : Labour and Employment Law Guy Lavoie : Labour and Employment Law / Workers' Compensation Law Jean Legault : Banking and Finance Law / Insolvency and Financial Restructuring Law Carl Lessard : Workers' Compensation Law / Labour and Employment Law Josiane L'Heureux : Labour and Employment Law Despina Mandilaras : Construction Law / Corporate and Commercial Litigation (Ones To Watch) Hugh Mansfield : Intellectual Property Law Zeïneb Mellouli : Labour and Employment Law Patrick A. Molinari : Health Care Law André Paquette : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Luc Pariseau : Tax Law Ariane Pasquier : Labour and Employment Law Jacques Paul-Hus : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Hubert Pepin : Labour and Employment Law Martin Pichette : Insurance Law / Professional Malpractice Law Élisabeth Pinard : Family Law François Renaud : Banking and Finance Law / Structured Finance Law Judith Rochette : Insurance Law / Professional Malpractice Law Ian Rose FCIArb : Director and Officer Liability Practice / Insurance Law Chantal Saint-Onge : Corporate and Commercial Litigation (Ones To Watch) Éric Thibaudeau : Workers' Compensation Law André Vautour : Corporate Governance Practice / Corporate Law / Information Technology Law / Intellectual Property Law / Technology Law Bruno Verdon : Corporate and Commercial Litigation Sébastien Vézina : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Yanick Vlasak : Corporate and Commercial Litigation Jonathan Warin : Insolvency and Financial Restructuring Law These recognitions are further demonstration of the expertise and quality of legal services that characterize Lavery’s professionals.

    Read more
  2. The Best Lawyers in Canada 2022 recognize 68 lawyers of Lavery

    Lavery is pleased to announce that 68 of its lawyers have been recognized as leaders in their respective fields of expertise by The Best Lawyers in Canada 2022. Lawyer of the Year   The following lawyers also received the Lawyer of the Year award in the 2022 edition of The Best Lawyers in Canada: Caroline Harnois: Family Law Mediation Bernard Larocque: Professional Malpractice Law   Consult the complete list of Lavery's lawyers and their fields of expertise: Josianne Beaudry : Mining Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law Dominique Bélisle : Energy Law Laurence Bich-Carrière : Class Action Litigation René Branchaud : Mining Law / Natural Resources Law / Securities Law Étienne Brassard : Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Real Estate Law / Equipment Finance Law Dominic Boisvert: Insurance Law (Ones To Watch) Luc R. Borduas : Corporate Law Daniel Bouchard : Environmental Law Jules Brière : Administrative and Public Law / Health Care Law Myriam Brixi : Class Action Litigation Benoit Brouillette : Labour and Employment Law Richard Burgos : Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law Marie-Claude Cantin : Construction Law / Insurance Law Charles Ceelen-Brasseur : Corporate Law (Ones To Watch) Eugène Czolij : Corporate and Commercial Litigation / Insolvency and Financial Restructuring Law Chantal Desjardins : Intellectual Property Law Jean-Sébastien Desroches : Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law Michel Desrosiers : Labour and Employment Law Raymond Doray, Ad. E : Administrative and Public Law / Defamation and Media Law / Privacy and Data Security Law Christian Dumoulin : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Alain Y. Dussault : Intellectual Property Law Isabelle Duval : Family Law Chloé Fauchon: Municipal Law (Ones To Watch) Philippe Frère : Administrative and Public Law Simon Gagné : Labour and Employment Law Nicolas Gagnon : Construction Law Richard Gaudreault : Labour and Employment Law Danielle Gauthier : Labour and Employment Law Julie Gauvreau : Intellectual Property Law Michel Gélinas : Labour and Employment Law Caroline Harnois : Family Law / Family Law Mediation / Trusts and Estates Marie-Josée Hétu : Labour and Employment Law Alain Heyne : Banking and Finance Law Édith Jacques : Corporate Law / Energy Law Pierre Marc Johnson, Ad. E., G.O.Q., MSRC : International Arbitration Marie-Hélène Jolicoeur : Labour and Employment Law Isabelle Jomphe : Intellectual Property Law Guillaume Laberge: Administrative and Public Law Jonathan Lacoste-Jobin: Insurance Law Awatif Lakhdar: Family Law Bernard Larocque: Class Action Litigation / Insurance Law / Professional Malpractice Law Myriam Lavallée: Labour and Employment Law Guy Lavoie: Labour and Employment Law / Workers’ Compensation Law Jean Legault: Banking and Finance Law / Insolvency and Financial Restructuring Law Carl Lessard: Labour and Employment Law / Workers' Compensation Law Josiane L'Heureux: Labour and Employment Law Hugh Mansfield : Intellectual Property Law Zeïneb Mellouli : Labour and Employment Law Patrick A. Molinari, Ad.E., MSRC : Health Care Law André Paquette: Mergers and Acquisitions Law Luc Pariseau : Tax Law Jacques Paul-Hus : Mergers & Acquisitions Law Ariane Pasquier : Labour and Employment Law Hubert Pepin : Labour and Employment Law Martin Pichette : Insurance Law / Professional Malpractice Law Élisabeth Pinard : Family Law François Renaud : Banking and Finance Law Marc Rochefort : Securities Law Judith Rochette : Professional Malpractice Law Ian Rose : Director and Officer Liability Practice / Insurance Law Éric Thibaudeau: Workers' Compensation Law Philippe Tremblay : Construction Law / Corporate and Commercial Litigation Jean-Philippe Turgeon : Franchise Law André Vautour : Corporate Law / Energy Law / Information Technology Law / Intellectual Property Law / Private Funds Law / Technology Law Bruno Verdon : Corporate and Commercial Litigation Sébastien Vézina : Mergers and Acquisitions Law Yanick Vlasak : Corporate and Commercial Litigation Jonathan Warin : Insolvency and Financial Restructuring Law

    Read more
  3. 25 partners from Lavery ranked in the 2019 edition of The Canadian Legal Lexpert Directory

    Lavery is proud to announce that 25 partners are ranked among the leading practitioners in Canada in their respective practice areas in the 2019 edition of The Canadian Legal Lexpert Directory. The following Lavery partners are listed in the 2019 edition of The Canadian Legal Lexpert Directory: Asset Equipment Finance/Leasing Pierre Denis Aviation (Regulation & Liability) Louis Charette Banking & Financial Institutions Louis Payette, Ad.E. Computer & IT Law André Vautour Construction law Nicolas Gagnon Corporate Commercial law *Étienne Brassard Corporate Finance & Securities *Josianne Beaudry René Branchaud Employment Law *Marie-Josée Hétu, CIRC *Zeïneb Mellouli Family Law Caroline Harnois Elisabeth Pinard Gerald Stotland Franchise law Jean-Philippe Turgeon Intellectual Property Chantal Desjardins Alain Y. Dussault Alain M. Leclerc Labour Relations Pierre-L. Baribeau Michel Desrosiers *Danielle Gauthier, CHRP Michel Gélinas *Marie-Josée Hétu Guy Lavoie, CIRC Litigation - Product Liability Louis Charette Mining *Josianne Beaudry René Branchaud Sébastien Vézina Occupational Health & Safety Josiane L’Heureux Property Leasing Richard Burgos Workers' Compensation Guy Lavoie, CIRC *New posting The Canadian Legal Lexpert Directory is the most comprehensive publication to legal talent in the country and it identifies leading practitioners in over 60 separate practice areas and leading law firms in over 40 practice areas. It is a reference guide for Canadian and foreign corporate counsels and law firms in need of specialized legal services in Canada. For more information, please visit Lexpert’s website at: http://www.lexpert.ca/directory.

    Read more
  4. 21 partners from Lavery ranked in the 2018 edition of The Canadian Legal Lexpert Directory

    Lavery is proud to announce that 21 partners are ranked among the leading practitioners in Canada in their respective practice areas in the 2018 edition of The Canadian Legal Lexpert Directory. “The fact that they are ranked amongst some of the most influential lawyers simply confirms their leading role in a competitive market. This distinction recognizes the depth of their expertise and the fact that they put their clients and partners at the forefront of their practice. Congratulations to all!”, stated Anik Trudel, Chief Executive Officer. The following Lavery partners are listed in the 2018 edition of The Canadian Legal Lexpert Directory: Asset Equipment Finance/Leasing Pierre Denis Benjamin David Gross Aviation (Regulation & Liability) Louis Charette Banking & Financial Institutions Louis Payette, Ad.E. Computer & IT Law André Vautour Construction law Nicolas Gagnon Corporate Commercial law André Vautour Corporate Finance & Securities René Branchaud Family Law *Caroline Harnois Elisabeth Pinard *Gerald Stotland Franchise law Jean-Philippe Turgeon Labour Relations *Pierre-L. Baribeau Michel Desrosiers Norman A. Dionne Michel Gélinas Guy Lavoie, CIRC Litigation - Commercial Insurance *Bernard Larocque Litigation - Product Liability Louis Charrette Mining René Branchaud Benjamin David Gross Sébastien Vézina Occupational Health & Safety Josiane L’Heureux Property Development *Louis-Martin Dubé Property Leasing *Richard Burgos *Louis-Martin Dubé Technology Transactions André Vautour Workers' Compensation Guy Lavoie, CIRC Workplace Human Rights Michel Gélinas *New posting The Canadian Legal Lexpert Directory is the most comprehensive publication to legal talent in the country and it identifies leading practitioners in over 60 separate practice areas and leading law firms in over 40 practice areas. It is a reference guide for Canadian and foreign corporate counsels and law firms in need of specialized legal services in Canada. For more information, please visit Lexpert’s website at: http://www.lexpert.ca/directory.

    Read more